Tag: meatless

Sauerkraut and Fish Salad. Hapukapsa-kalasalat

hapukapsakalasalat (13)Homemade Sauerkraut, Fermented Cabbage, Hapukapsas is a very important and popular dish in Estonia during autumn and winter time and mandatory food during Christmas time.

In ancient time, Hapukapsas and cranberries were only sources of C vitamin, during wintertime.
Sauerkraut is a fermented food and this is not the only a source of vitamin, this is the source of the probiotic bacterium and this is excellent for your health.

One wonderful salad recipe.
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Creamy Cauliflower and lentil puree soup with mushroom cream. Lillkapsa ja läätsesupp seentega

lillkapsalaatsesupp (15)This is very simple and delicious everyday vegetable soup. And most important! This soup takes only 15 minutes.
Of course, I assume, that you use prepared mushroom ( as I do).

Fresh chanterelle: The mushrooms are cleaned without water, with only a clean, dry towel and paring knife. Heat the chanterelle in a skillet without fat/butter until water has evaporated.

Frozen mushroom: melt, fry slightly.

Continue reading “Creamy Cauliflower and lentil puree soup with mushroom cream. Lillkapsa ja läätsesupp seentega”

Barley groats and Turnip Salad. Odratangusalat kaalikaga

odrakaalikasalat (4)A fresh, light, Estonian-inspired salad perfect for a  dinner. Perfect to use boiled barley groats leftovers.

This is the explosion of flavours and textures. Crispy cucumbers, sour cranberries and mushrooms, soft egg, sweet turnip and groats, which are tieing everything into one whole
As every salad, combine ingredients as you like. This is one possible combination. You can replace mushrooms and add ham or other meat.

Continue reading “Barley groats and Turnip Salad. Odratangusalat kaalikaga”

Apple, Celery and Parsnip Soup. Õuna selleri ja pastinaagisupp

sellerisupp (10)This is a wonderful combination. Apple gives acid, celery bitterness and parsnip is sweet. All ingredients complement each other. And look at this light colour!

Change products combination and shares depending on your taste. If you like more sweet, add more parsnip and if you like more acid, use more apples.

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Rowan Berries and Cottage Cheese Salad. Pihlaka- kodujuustusalat

pihlakasalat (6)Rowan Berries are very healthy. The astringent taste fades with freezing, so the best time to pick them is winter.

But.
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If in your home forest are living greedy birds, you should pick them as soon as possible and leave in a deep freezer at least for 3 hours.

more options:
soak berries in salted water (1 teaspoon salt in 1-litre water)
or keep berries  3- 4 minutes in boiling water

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Mash some berries and mix with sour cream
season with salt, sugar and pepper
Chop (red) onion or leek
add marinated or salted mushrooms
and cottage cheese
decorate with rowan berries
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Thick Potatoes. Paksud kartulid

pakskartul (7)Very nutritious vegetable dish. Combine different vegetables for a different result.

And add more colour by adding more carrots or turnip or celery.

Serve with a side dish with meat or fish. Or as vegetable porridge.
Serve with sour cream or butter. And drink some sour milk, as Estonians usually do 🙂

 

Did you know?
Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3, the bacteria discovered in 1995 by the University of Tartu research teams, led by professors Marika Mikelsaar and Mihkel Zilmer, are unique in the world because of their combination of antimicrobial and antioxidative effects. They protect human health by attacking harmful microbes and contributing to physical well-being. The ME-3 can rightfully be called the first Estonian probiotic lactic acid bacteria and the EU patent permits it to be used in the food industry in 15 European countries. Continue reading “Thick Potatoes. Paksud kartulid”

Turnip and Mushroom Fritters. Kaalika-seenekotletid

seenekaalikakotlett (9)

The great vegetable dish. This time I used salted mushroom .

As Estonia has an abundance of forest, we like to pick berries and mushrooms.

and for winter Mushrooms are marinated, or salted or fermented. Or dried

Salted mushroom:
How to remove additional salt are a lot of tips.
My South Estonian relatives told me that they boiling salted mushroom in milk. And after that mushroom look and taste like a fresh.
Second option is  to boil mushroom just in the water.
And the simplest one.  Put mushroom to soak the night before.

Fresh chanterelle: The mushrooms are cleaned without water, with only a clean, dry towel and paring knife. Heat the chanterelle in a skillet without fat/butter until water has evaporated.

Frozen mushroom : melt, fry slightly.

Continue reading “Turnip and Mushroom Fritters. Kaalika-seenekotletid”

Buckwheat and Quark Fritters. Tatra- kohupiimapallid

tatrapall1 (5)Good dish for “meat free Mondays ” 🙂

Notice, that if you change balance of buckwheat and quark  in favour of buckwheat, you receive more crispy result. Eat warm, because cold dish become crispy, as well (what is not bad at all).

In my picture are balls. But if you prefer to serve them as burger, form loaves.

I’m not a big fan of frying these fritters as I barely have time, plus I get my sufficient amount of fat from other sources anyway. 🙂

Therefore, I’ve adapted the  recipe for baking in the oven.

In case you want to fry on to the skillet: leave dough in to the refrigerator at least for  an 1 hour, before frying.

I decided, that buckwheat flour is too expensive, so I did this by myself from buckwheat groats 🙂 In this case  I suggest to use closed mill: blender or similar. otherwise count with cleaning… 🙂
Groats are so light, that they are jumping out from your mixer:)

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Estonian Potatoes and Groats Mash. Mulgipuder

mulgipuder1 (4)Mulgi-Mulgimaa is a district in South-Estonia with its own culture, food and dialect.

My mother is Mulk and so am I. Mulgipuder means Mulgi’s porridge. This dish is very old though. In former times when people had wood burning stoves, the porridge was placed on a stove in the morning where it had time to cook and get simmer and better. People just had more time.

Mulgid (the people who lived in Mulgimaa) were wealthy. But because in early times animals were more important than people, they were usually to ones who got to eat the porridge first. And if there was anything left from the dish it was passed on to the rest of the family. Like my mother used to say – the Mulgi’s porridge was a pig food (Bon appétit! Sorry!)

Despite all, I and Estonians love this dish. It’s very, very nourishing and filling with an option to cook it completely vegan-friendly!

Potato and pearl barley porridge, i.e. potato-barley mash, originates from Southern Estonia. People in Southern Estonia (the Mulgi people) started boiling potatoes and pearl barley together in the second half of the 19th century as the combination was very filling. By the last quarter of the 19th century, this porridge was known all over Estonia. In the second half of the 20th century, this dish reached cafeterias as well and it has by now become a national dish that is served at various official events.

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