Category: Barley

Barley Groat and Pumpkin Fritters. Kruubi ja kõrvitsakotletid

A great vegetable dinner with Estonian twist.  Sweet pumpkin flavour is combined with pleasantly grainy barley groats. It is very easy and quick dinner from only 3 ingredients.

Cooking and preparing barley takes a lot of time, so it would be perfect dinner from leftovers. To add more flavours you can add some cheese or caraway seeds.
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Estonian Saarde Grated Potato Scone. Saarde Kartuli Riivkarask

riivkarask 1(8)Saarde is the region in South Estonia.

And this is a light and simple summer dish was to use meat leftovers. The most complicated part in this recipe is to grate potatoes, but other… this is easy to bake  😉

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Estonian Saarde Grated Potato Scone. Saarde Kartuli Riivkarask”

Thick Potatoes. Paksud kartulid

pakskartul (7)Very nutritious vegetable dish. Combine different vegetables for a different result.

And add more colour by adding more carrots or turnip or celery.

Serve with a side dish with meat or fish. Or as vegetable porridge.
Serve with sour cream or butter. And drink some sour milk, as Estonians usually do 🙂

 

Did you know?
Lactobacillus fermentum ME-3, the bacteria discovered in 1995 by the University of Tartu research teams, led by professors Marika Mikelsaar and Mihkel Zilmer, are unique in the world because of their combination of antimicrobial and antioxidative effects. They protect human health by attacking harmful microbes and contributing to physical well-being. The ME-3 can rightfully be called the first Estonian probiotic lactic acid bacteria and the EU patent permits it to be used in the food industry in 15 European countries. Continue reading “Thick Potatoes. Paksud kartulid”

Barley Flour Mousse. Odrajahuvaht

odravaht (4)
One of the oldest grain cereals in Estonia was barley
Barley was the mundane and the ordinary food and belonged on the table for common people. The oldest data of barley growing in Estonia dates back to the beginning of the first millennium BC.

Barley Flour Mousse is a light and delicious dessert. Using cranberry juice you get pink and fluffy and using apple juice very light mousse.

If Barley Cream seems to you too exotic, cook Semolina Cream. look at for recipe

 

Continue reading “Barley Flour Mousse. Odrajahuvaht”

Barley Groats and Apple Creme Brulee. Kruubi brüleekreem õuntega

An international and famous dessert with a small Estonian twist and ingredients

I have not words to express how tasty, watermouthing and great dessert it is. Small apple pieces and cowberries give juiciness and moisture and wonderful sour and sweet flavour. Barley groats give a structure and make this dessert more interesting,

And again real Estonian flavour: barley groats, apples and cowberries. You just have to try this.
kruubibrylee (1)
Continue reading “Barley Groats and Apple Creme Brulee. Kruubi brüleekreem õuntega”

Very Simple Juicy Apple and Barley Flour Cake. Õuna- odrajahukook

odra6unakook (8)One of the oldest grain cereals in Estonia was barley.

Barley was the mundane and the ordinary food and belonged on the table for common people. The oldest data of barley growing in Estonia dates back to the beginning of the first millennium BC.

And we still love barley. Karask is a famous dish in Estonian ethnic cuisine. But add some apples, and you get very delicious, simple and juicy cake.

Continue reading “Very Simple Juicy Apple and Barley Flour Cake. Õuna- odrajahukook”

Estonian flat bread. Vatskid

all ingenious is simple and all simple is ingenious.

Last year I introduced to you Pletskid- Estonian flat bread from very difficult and poor time. When people had just few potatoes and little bit oil.
Vatskid are from South Estonia, as well, but little bit more advanced version. From times when people had at least some buttermilk 🙂

Vatskid was baked on oven on the cabbage leaf. Believe, the most complicated in this recipe is to remove leaves from cabbage  🙂 Cabbage leaf helps keep moisture.

But, of course you can bake them on the ordinary way in hot skillet (without oil) or in the oven.
vatsk1 (6) Continue reading “Estonian flat bread. Vatskid”

Broad Bean Soup. Kõrtsisupp

k6rtsisupp1(6)Beans are traditional Good Friday dish.

Barley has been cultivated in Estonia longer than any other crops – for over 4,000 years. And pearl barley has been a staple food for Estonians through the ages; it has even been a food fit for celebrations. In the olden days, the tradition in Estonian villages was to make sauerkraut soup with pork and barley groats on Thursdays and Sundays.

You can cook this soup on the traditional way: swell beans and barley overnight. Prepare beautiful and delicious broth, and cook up to 2 hours.

But I recommend the easier and faster ”everyday version”:

This soup has enough flavours, so you can cook this without meat. If needed add some meat leftovers or strengthen flavour with ready broth.
And Use prepared/canned beans and barley groats.

Continue reading “Broad Bean Soup. Kõrtsisupp”

Barley Groats and Quark fritters. Kruubi- ja kohupiimakotletid

kruubikohup (7)This is a recipe, which outcome you can choose by yourself.

Easy to make Barley Groats and Quark pancakes or fritters, which can be served either as a side dish for a savoury meal or as a delicious dessert.

My recipe is a savoury dish. But adding some sugar, you get sweet dessert.

Wonderful dish and idea to use boiled barley leftovers.

 

 

 

 

Continue reading “Barley Groats and Quark fritters. Kruubi- ja kohupiimakotletid”

Estonian Potatoes and Groats Mash. Mulgipuder

mulgipuder1 (4)Mulgi-Mulgimaa is a district in South-Estonia with its own culture, food and dialect.

My mother is Mulk and so am I. Mulgipuder means Mulgi’s porridge. This dish is very old though. In former times when people had wood burning stoves, the porridge was placed on a stove in the morning where it had time to cook and get simmer and better. People just had more time.

Mulgid (the people who lived in Mulgimaa) were wealthy. But because in early times animals were more important than people, they were usually to ones who got to eat the porridge first. And if there was anything left from the dish it was passed on to the rest of the family. Like my mother used to say – the Mulgi’s porridge was a pig food (Bon appétit! Sorry!)

Despite all, I and Estonians love this dish. It’s very, very nourishing and filling with an option to cook it completely vegan-friendly!

Potato and pearl barley porridge, i.e. potato-barley mash, originates from Southern Estonia. People in Southern Estonia (the Mulgi people) started boiling potatoes and pearl barley together in the second half of the 19th century as the combination was very filling. By the last quarter of the 19th century, this porridge was known all over Estonia. In the second half of the 20th century, this dish reached cafeterias as well and it has by now become a national dish that is served at various official events.

Continue reading “Estonian Potatoes and Groats Mash. Mulgipuder”