Tag: slow cooking

Estonian Potatoes and Groats Mash. Mulgipuder

mulgipuder1 (4)Mulgi-Mulgimaa is a district in South-Estonia with its own culture, food and dialect.

My mother is Mulk and so am I. Mulgipuder means Mulgi’s porridge. This dish is very old though. In former times when people had wood burning stoves the porridge was placed on a stove in the morning where it had time to cook and get simmer and better. People just had more time.

Mulgid (the people who lived in Mulgimaa) were wealthy. But because in early times animals were more important than people, they were usually to ones who got to eat the porridge first. And if there was anything left from the dish it was passed on to the rest of the family. Like my mother used to say – the Mulgi’s porridge was a pig food (Bon appétit! Sorry!)

Despite all, me and Estonians love this dish. It’s very, very nourishing and filling with an option to cook it completely vegan-friendly!

Potato and pearl barley porridge, i.e. potato-barley mash, originates from Southern Estonia. People in Southern Estonia (the Mulgi people) started boiling potatoes and pearl barley together in the second half of the 19th century as the combination was very filling. By the last quarter of the 19th century, this porridge was known all over Estonia. In the second half of the 20th century, this dish reached cafeterias as well and it has by now become a national dish that is served at various official events.

Continue reading “Estonian Potatoes and Groats Mash. Mulgipuder”

Roasted Pork Leg. Ahjukoot

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Roasted Pork Leg

Pork Leg is a traditional Estonian Shrove Tuesday dish. On that day, everything except for the pork legs was eaten.

So before fast, pork legs were used to create an additional greasy, delicious dinner. Last year I wrote about Shrove Tuesday’s customs.
Now, when I think about my childhood school times, on every Shrove Tuesday we had this tradition of going on a 15 km ski-hike.

It happened quite often that on that exact day we had crazy snowstorms and it was terrible! Well, sure, hot pea-soup and Shrove Tuesday’s whipped cream jam filled sweet-buns were waiting for you when you finally got back but still…

Due to global warming or some other unusual phenomenon the snow from November to March isn’t that common anymore. Ironically, I would love to have a chance to ski now… And. Fortunately this year we have real winter with snow 🙂

Btw. Can you tell me why two words: fast food =junk food and fast as fasting have different and contrary meaning but the same base and strain?

Continue reading “Roasted Pork Leg. Ahjukoot”

Rice with Pork. Plov

This January, I would like to introduce you to a foreign dish that throughout the years has become more and more popular in Estonia to the point where me and my fellow Estonians consider it being part of our national cuisine.

Plov. Originally, it’s a dish from the Middle East/Central Asia that has gone through a long journey from south to north to our dinner tables. With some touches of local seasoning and ingredients Plov has become one of the most common ”everyday meals” in Estonia. As Estonians love pork so much, one of the main ingredients of the Estonian Plov is definitely pork.

Rice with Pork. Plov

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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A East dish with Estonian twist and touch. Plov

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Rice with Pork. Plov

Continue reading “Rice with Pork. Plov”

How To Do Meat Jelly/Aspic. Sült

Aspic or Meat jelly is a savoury jelly made from meat.

Meat Jelly, Sült is very good example, how time changes the meaning of some food. In old times Sült was winter time food. Because it takes 4-6 hours to cook it and this will heat up the kitchen. Because in old times for winter was left only pork legs and heads, which are suitable for cooking Sült. It was “poor” food. And food for poor. Today all ladies know, how important is collagen…:)

Today, for me, this is perfect summer dish. Sült is served cold and with cold cottage cheese sauce and boiled fresh potatoes.. yummy 🙂

Sült is a dish traditionally made from a mixture of meat, trotters, hocks, rind and other ingredients that have been cooked for several hours and cooled afterwards, forming a jelly. A traditional Christmas and wedding food, served as an appetizer or as a meal itself.

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Meat Jelly. Sült

My father still cooking Sült himself. It is very complicated to cook  Sült only  for 2 persons and still you need very large pot. So, I buy Sült in summer time from culinary.  And in winter time, I get it from my father. This is my father recipe.

For cooking Sült you need glue-rich meat. Continue reading “How To Do Meat Jelly/Aspic. Sült”

Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

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Traditional Pea Soup. Hernesupp

Vastlapäev, known as Shrove Tuesday in much of the English-speaking world, the Estonians celebrate this day a little differently.

Instead of pancakes, we eat split pea soup and the delicious Vastlakukkel cream cake.
Traditionally children will sled down any available hill of snow, to get “long linens”.  And not only children. Tomorrow, after meeting I am going with my colleges  to sled, as well.
And later we have pea soup and Vastlakukkel!
Today, of course nobody care about linen, this is just for fun:)

The name Vastlapaev is taken from the German word “fasten” (to fast). And after Vastlapäev started fast, because meat was ran out.

Traditional pea soup takes time, so this is reasonable to cook more soup and leftovers freeze or store in clean airtight jar.

Traditional Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

  • Servings: 4-6
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Traditional Estonian Pea Soup takes time, but it is worth it

Ingredients

  • 500 g pork, best is (smoked) leg or ribs or pork belly
  • 0,5 glass of pearl barley
  • 400 g dried yellow peas
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • for seasoning salt, mustard, pepper, garlic

Continue reading “Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp”

Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley. Mulgikapsad

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Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley. Mulgikapsad

Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley is called ” Mulgikapsad”. Kapsad- means Cabbage and
Mulgi- Mulgimaa is area  in South-Estonia, with own culture, traditions, food and dialect.

This area and culture is perfect example about the globalisation already in 19th of century. During the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865 was lack of cotton and price was very high.
So, was demand for alternatives. South Estonia, Mulgimaa has perfect conditions for cultivation of linen. Bondage was in Estonia abolished 1816, but still farmers were very poor and land was owned by landlords. But because of America and demand for linen, farmers gets enough money to buy from landlords land and farms. And this area become rich and successful. This made others little bit jealous and they started to call people and this area Mulgimaa 🙂
In Latvia means word- Mulk- ” silly” and in Estonia it means “hole”- in meaning that the all richness went in to the one hole…:)

I am Mulk ( person, who is living and born in Mulgimaa), as well. My mothers ancestry have been lived in Mulgimaa more than 400 years. Maybe more, but we have first written documents from 1630 of year 🙂

Mulgikapsad can be served as a meal unto itself, usually with boiled potato and certainly with some fermented milk for drink. You may cook this as vegan, without meat.

Barley has been cultivated in Estonia longer than any other crops – for over 4,000 years. And pearl barley has been a staple food for Estonians through the ages; it has even been a food fit for celebrations. In the olden days, the tradition in Estonian villages was to make sauerkraut soup with pork and barley groats on Thursdays and Sundays.

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Sauerkraut Soup. Hapukapsasupp

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Sauerkraut Soup. Hapukapsasupp

Soup from Sauerkraut, fermented cabbage, is very easy to cook.

How to make Sauerkraut, look at this recipe

Sauerkraut Soup

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
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Sauerkraut sour and salty soup is warming winter-time dish, which needs time to get best result

Ingredients

  • ca 500 g streaky and fat pork with bones
  • 500 g sauerkraut
  • 1/2 cup barley groats
  • 3 litre cold water
  • 1 grated carrot and onion, if you cabbage is not contains carrot
  • salt, pepper, bay leaf,sugar, mustard, caraway seeds and vodka

Directions

  1. Put meat, cabbage and barley in to cold water, and let to boil
  2. Remove foam
  3. Add salt, pepper, bay leaf and let soup simmer while all ingredients ready (min 1 hour)
  4. Add grated carrot and onion.
  5. Season and let soup simmer, while all flavours are felt. As much time you have to let soup simmer, as best result you get.
  6. Serve with sour- cream. Head isu!

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Vegetable Soup. Village Soup. Külasupp.

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Vegetable Soup. Village Soup. Külasupp

This is easy and delicious vegetable soup.

Vegetable Soup. Village Soup. Külasupp.

  • Servings: 4-6
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A tasty vegetable soup, easy to cook

Ingredients

  • ca 0,5 glass groats. If using natural groats, let them at least 1 hour to swell
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • 2 potatoes
  • 1 turnip
  • smoked ribs or ham
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • salt, pepper, bay leaf
Continue reading “Vegetable Soup. Village Soup. Külasupp.”

Roasted Pork with Sauerkraut. Sealiha hapukapsaga

As You probably know, Estonians are the least religious nation.
The Estonian word jõulud (Christmas) is of ancient Scandinavian origin and comes directly from the word Jul/ Hjul  which means “cycle”,  and has no real connection with Christianity.

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Roasted Pork with Sauerkraut. Sealiha hapukapsaga

In 22th of December the Sun rises in Estonia at 9. 17 a clock and  sets at 15.22. So, we do not need any fairy tales. We have very practical reason to celebrate 🙂
Jõulud as the winter solstice , when the day is the shortest and the night the longest, is celebrated between December 21 and 25. According to folk-tradition, “the sun was laying in the nest” and the day was celebrated as the Sun’s birthday. From that day on, the Sun started to rise and move slowly to the north again.

Continue reading “Roasted Pork with Sauerkraut. Sealiha hapukapsaga”

Duck Legs with Cranberries

This is weekend food for lazy people 🙂

Duck Legs with Cranberries

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: easy
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A delicious slow cooking food for weekend.

Ingredients

  • 4 duck legs
  • 3 cloves garlic, sliced
  • 3-4 bay leaf
  • ca 100 g cranberries, slovenly crushed
  • salt, pepper

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Duck Legs with Cranberries

Directions

  1. Rub the duck legs with garlic, cranberries and bay leaf. And leave set for overnight ( in fridge)
  2. Preheat oven up to a maximum ( 220 C)
  3. Season duck with pepper and salt
  4. Cover oven pot with lid and reduce heat up to 165
  5. Cook 3 hours.
  6. Head isu!


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Duck Legs With Cranberries

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