6 Simple Salad to accompany the main dish

Radish and Egg Salad

I have been to many countries, and one of the biggest differences in eating culture/habits/cuicine is how salad is served.
Salad as a main or separate dish, this is understandable. You can have Caesare Salad for lunch for example.

But, how is salad served, as accompany for the main dish, are differences between countries.

There are three courses in most countries : appetizer;  main dish, which includes protein and salad and then dessert.

However, there are exceptions, as well. I was  amazed to see that in Portugal rice and potato (with some meat/fish) were served on the same plate  .. In addition to that we visited a restaurant with a very  generous cook  in Malta 🙂 french fries, boiled potato, couscous, pasta were on the same plate.  And some bread of course. and a LOT of meat 🙂

In Estonia the three courses means usually 1. soup; 2. main dish containing protein, garnish (potato, rice, pasta, buckwheat…) and salad.  And finally 3. dessert.
We have grown up with the”plate rule”. Plate rule means that the meal on your plate should have 1/4 protein, 1/4 garnish and 1/2 salad.
And it is not the case only when cooking  home or at school. Most restaurants follow the same logic. Ok, except for  fancier and finer  more tourist oriented restaurants, of course.

Typical Estonian  salad comes with sour cream /mayonnaise sauce. Nowadays youngsters prefer u

Plate Rule

sing more vinegar/oil instead.

There are my favourite simple salads.

Easy to do, because of just few components.
And remind then:) serving Estonian dish, you should full half of the plate with one or mix of these salads. Then 1/4 potato or pasta or rice or buckwheat. And then some fish or meat. .. 🙂

Tomato Cucumber Salad
This is, I believe most common, usual, traditional everyday salad in Estonia

Tomato and Cucumber Salad

Chop tomato and/or cucumber
Add sour cream
and lot of fresh dill and chives, salt and pepper Continue reading

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Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

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Traditional Pea Soup. Hernesupp

Vastlapäev, known as Shrove Tuesday in much of the English-speaking world, the Estonians celebrate this day a little differently.

Instead of pancakes, we eat split pea soup and the delicious Vastlakukkel cream cake.
Traditionally children will sled down any available hill of snow, to get “long linens”.  And not only children. Tomorrow, after meeting I am going with my colleges  to sled, as well.
And later we have pea soup and Vastlakukkel!
Today, of course nobody care about linen, this is just for fun:)

The name Vastlapaev is taken from the German word “fasten” (to fast). And after Vastlapäev started fast, because meat was ran out.

Traditional pea soup takes time, so this is reasonable to cook more soup and leftovers freeze or store in clean airtight jar.

Traditional Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Time: 2hr
  • Print

Traditional Estonian Pea Soup takes time, but it is worth it

Ingredients

  • 500 g pork, best is (smoked) leg or ribs or pork belly
  • 0,5 glass of pearl barley
  • 400 g dried yellow peas
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • for seasoning salt, mustard, pepper, garlic

Continue reading

Green Pea Soup

Green Pea Soup

Pour in to bouling water frozen peas and some slice garlic.
Boil 3 min.

Strain water in to other dish.

Puree peas. Add some garlic fresh cheese and cream and/or boiled pea-water to achive  the desired consistency.

Green Pea Soup