The Real Neat Blog Award

real-neat-blog-award

Rini from All Roads Lead to Food nominated me for the Real Neat Blog Award ! Vau! 🙂

I have been blogging few months and  there are already so many memes.
I appreciate attention, and most important for me this community  feeling, cooperation and recognition of each other.

The Rules:
Thank and link the person who nominated you.
Answer the seven questions your nominator has provided.
Nominate 7 other bloggers and create 7 questions for them. Continue reading “The Real Neat Blog Award”

Black Bread Dessert. Leivasupp

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Black Bread Dessert. Leivasupp

So, You baked black bread and probably have some leftovers. This is the easiest dessert in the world.
NB! of course, if you have very salty bread with caraway seeds, this is not dessert to you. Then make better Garlic Breads.

 

Already medieval cookbooks included recommendations to use toasted and grated black bread to make desserts. Baltic German cooks made black bread pudding with apples or chocolate and wine, rum or cognac. During the inter-war period, Estonian housewives took to making various desserts out of black bread, e.g. a chocolate pudding with black bread. In Soviet times, bread soup was often served in cafeterias, but people made it at home as well.

Black bread plays a major role in Estonian culture. There are tons of superstitions, traditions and old sayings about bread here. For example, you shouldn’t slice a new loaf in the evening or it will shrink, though this saying has become obsolete with the introduction of pre-sliced bread. Also, if you drop your slice of bread, you shouldn’t throw it away – you should pick it up, kiss it and then continue eating. And eating the heel piece will give you big breasts.
Continue reading “Black Bread Dessert. Leivasupp”

(Kohuke) Chocolate and Cherry Surprise

Emily made Kohuke!!! 🙂
Read how it succeed and enjoy beautiful photos!

Emilys Home Cooked kitchen

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Kohuke are a chocolate glazed quark snack.  Do be alarmed these are tasty bites when popped into your mouth whole.  All the flavours mingle together to taste like a black forest cheese cake!   Yum

Kohuke is a traditional Estonian recipe and is served as snacks and treats.  I got this recipe from Ruta who has kindly said I can share her recipe with you all.

https://estoniancuisine.com/about-estonian-food-blog/  Click on Ruta’s, blog link. There is lots of different recipes, its a great blog.  I love learning about different countries and their specialties.

I made them yesterday and took them to my Slimming World Group where once a month we have tasters of healthier food.  They were a big hit, everyone loved them.  When asked what they were called I said “chocolate, cheesy, balls!”   Thanks to my friend Sarah, they have a new name, Chocolate and Cherry Surprise, this is so much better!!

(I…

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Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

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Traditional Pea Soup. Hernesupp

Vastlapäev, known as Shrove Tuesday in much of the English-speaking world, the Estonians celebrate this day a little differently.

Instead of pancakes, we eat split pea soup and the delicious Vastlakukkel cream cake.
Traditionally children will sled down any available hill of snow, to get “long linens”.  And not only children. Tomorrow, after meeting I am going with my colleges  to sled, as well.
And later we have pea soup and Vastlakukkel!
Today, of course nobody care about linen, this is just for fun:)

The name Vastlapaev is taken from the German word “fasten” (to fast). And after Vastlapäev started fast, because meat was ran out.

Traditional pea soup takes time, so this is reasonable to cook more soup and leftovers freeze or store in clean airtight jar.

Traditional Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Print

Traditional Estonian Pea Soup takes time, but it is worth it

Ingredients

  • 500 g pork, best is (smoked) leg or ribs or pork belly
  • 0,5 glass of pearl barley
  • 400 g dried yellow peas
  • 1 onion, sliced
  • 2 carrots, sliced
  • for seasoning salt, mustard, pepper, garlic

Continue reading “Estonian Pea Soup. Hernesupp”

2016/2017 TAG!

I have been food blogger just some months and already second blog-challenge!! 🙂
Thank you Carol for tagging:)
Please visit her blog https://cookingforthetimechallenged.wordpress.com/2017/02/20/20162017-tag/ to get real inspiration and answer  The Biggest Question..:) What is for dinner 🙂
The tag was created by David from The Guy Who Said Always No.
Please show your support and visit both of these wonderful blogs.

tag-2016-2017-award

Continue reading “2016/2017 TAG!”

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How To Do Estonian Black Bread. Leib

Estonian Black Bread is fermented Rye Bread.
For this bread we have even the own word: LEIB.
“white wheat bread” we call “Sai”.

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Estonian Black Rye Bread. Leib

Of course, shops are  full of different breads, even with nuts and chocolate.
But some years ago, our first lady Evelin Ilves promoted the homemade bread. So, today, I believe, all Estonian woman has their own home-made bread recipe.

Each estonian eat  ca 10 kg white wheat bread and 30 kg black rye bread per year, so Rye bread is very popular and I can say, that this is something very “Estonian”.

24th February is Estonian Independence Day,  our republic become 99 years old 🙂
so this is the best day to bake the Estonian traditional rye Leib.

Continue reading “How To Do Estonian Black Bread. Leib”

Shrove Tuesday Buns. Vastlakuklid

oo, I LOVE Shrove Tuesday Buns:)

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Shrove Tuesday Buns. Vastlakukkel

I do not eat and like too much cookies and pies, but twice in the year: gingerbread and Shrove Tuesday Buns… I can eat without shame and limit 🙂

It seems easy stuff, but in Estonia we have two parties. One camps say that Vastlakukkel must be only with whipped cream. And others are sure, that it must contain whipped cream and jam. So, choice is yours.

Shrove Tuesday Buns

  • Servings: 15-16 buns
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

A traditional Shrove Tuesday dessert after Pea Soup and Pork legs

Ingredients

  • 2 dl milk
  • 25 g yeast
  • 3 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 100 g butter
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon cardamom
  • 6 dl flour
  • 1 egg for coating buns
Continue reading “Shrove Tuesday Buns. Vastlakuklid”

Mystery Blogger Award!

img_9956I do not have long history as food blogger, and I am amazed and happy that Elizabeth from https://thecomfortablecoop.wordpress.com
noticed my blog and nominated me for the Mystery Blogger Award.
Thank you! Seems, I have to keep blogging 🙂

Okoto from Okoto Enigma created this award and, in her words, the “Mystery Blogger Award is an award for amazing bloggers with ingenious posts. Their blog not only captivates; it inspires and motivates. They are one of the best out there, and they deserve every recognition they get. This award is also for bloggers who find fun and inspiration in blogging; and they do it with so much love and passion.” So you can see why I consider this a great honor!

Continue reading “Mystery Blogger Award!”

Chicken and Rice

dsc01611Simple everyday supper.

Chicken and Rice

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

A light and simple to cook everyday supper

Ingredients

  • 1 chicken leg or thigh for each eater
  • 250 ml rice
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 onion
  • ca 200 g frozen peas
  • salt,pepper, oil for cooking

Directions

  1. Season chicken with salt and pepper and fry in to hot oil in all sides
  2. Put fried chicken in to oven pot, add sliced carrot, onion, rice and 800 ml water
  3. Cook in lid covered pot in to the oven 180C 30 minute
  4. Add peas, and let them melt

Soundtrack  Liisi Koikson ” Kaks kuukiirt mu toas”

Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley. Mulgikapsad

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Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley. Mulgikapsad

Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley is called ” Mulgikapsad”. Kapsad- means Cabbage and
Mulgi- Mulgimaa is area  in South-Estonia, with own culture, traditions, food and dialect.

This area and culture is perfect example about the globalisation already in 19th of century. During the American Civil War from 1861 to 1865 was lack of cotton and price was very high.
So, was demand for alternatives. South Estonia, Mulgimaa has perfect conditions for cultivation of linen. Bondage was in Estonia abolished 1816, but still farmers were very poor and land was owned by landlords. But because of America and demand for linen, farmers gets enough money to buy from landlords land and farms. And this area become rich and successful. This made others little bit jealous and they started to call people and this area Mulgimaa 🙂
In Latvia means word- Mulk- ” silly” and in Estonia it means “hole”- in meaning that the all richness went in to the one hole…:)

I am Mulk ( person, who is living and born in Mulgimaa), as well. My mothers ancestry have been lived in Mulgimaa more than 400 years. Maybe more, but we have first written documents from 1630 of year 🙂

Mulgikapsad can be served as a meal unto itself, usually with boiled potato and certainly with some fermented milk for drink. You may cook this as vegan, without meat.

Barley has been cultivated in Estonia longer than any other crops – for over 4,000 years. And pearl barley has been a staple food for Estonians through the ages; it has even been a food fit for celebrations. In the olden days, the tradition in Estonian villages was to make sauerkraut soup with pork and barley groats on Thursdays and Sundays.

Continue reading “Estonian Style Sauerkraut with Pork and Barley. Mulgikapsad”